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Tumbnail: 62 oz-in NEMA 17 Stepping motors (also called stepper motor)

NEMA 17 Stepping Motor (62 oz-in 5mm single shaft)

$19.95
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Image of the Atmega324p

Atmega324P

$8.50
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10K timmer potentiometer

10K Trimmer Potentiometer (Through Hole)

$0.85
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16x2 LCD (Liquid Crystal Display)

16x2 LCD (Liquid Crystal Display)

$12.50
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White prototyping breadboard with 30 tie strips and two power rails on each side.

White Prototyping Breadboard (2x30 columns of tie strips and 2x2 rows of power strips)

$7.95
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Clear Semi Transparent Breadboard

Clear Prototyping Breadboard (2x30 columns of tie strips and 2x2 rows of power strips)

$8.50
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Red Through Hole LED (Light emitting diode)

Single Red Through Hole LED (Light Emitting Diode)

$0.34
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Green through hole LED (light emitting diode)

Single Green Through Hole LED (Light Emitting Diode)

$0.34
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Yellow through hole LED (light emitting diode)

Single Yellow Through Hole LED (Light Emitting Diode)

$0.34
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Show and Tell

Where the proud projects lie! Do you have a project? Let me know !

Erik Vencent's Clock and Timing Project

Image of Erik's project layout

Check out Erik's project. He demonstrates using an external timer for his ATMega 168 microcontroller to achieve a more accurate timing rather than using the internal timer. Instead of showing his output on an LCD, since he didn't have enough pins available for the LCD's 8-bit interface, he chose to show the results through serial communication on his computer.

Joe Z.'s Unique Hello World Project

Image of joes hello world morse code LED microcontroller project

Everyone knows the first program is called the "Hello World" project. The Hello World program is intended for the newbie programmer get their feet wet and be as simple as possible. This is why, in the embedded realm, the Hello World programs is to simply turn on an LED. Joe didn't want to settle for the typical Light up, or blink the LED. He wanted to literally make a single LED communicate. How would a single LED communicate? Using morse code, obviously.